Reducing Your Family’s Carbon Footprint

Lately, rather than working on my blog, I have spent many nights reading news articles about politics and becoming increasingly frustrated by our new president’s executive orders, which are quickly changing our world, and not for the better.

As a concerned parent, I am taking action in what small ways I am able to.

An issue that has been on my mind for a while now and is becoming more and more imperative to address is the issue of climate change and protecting our environment.

There is a large body of research showing that climate change is REAL. Records prove thatthe Earth’s average temperatures are rising steadily every year and most scientists agree that increased carbon emissions are the main contributor to this rise in global temperatures. There are too many references to list here but if you would like to learn more about all of the research that has been done and published after peer review please go to http://www.pubmed.com and search for key terms “climate change,” “environmental change,” or “global warming.”

If you would like to see what it looks like to live in a country with little pollution control try googling “China pollution.” The images that come up are horrific.

Also check out this recent article in the Huffington Post which contains a powerful set of images of what our very own country looked like before the Environmental Protection Agency was formed.

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Total Emissions in 2014= 6,870 Million Metric Tons of CO2 equivalent. Statistic and graphic courtesy of the EPA.

Unfortunately, rather than making the reduction of greenhouse gases a priority, our current administration appears to be taking our nation back to these times.

While our leaders may not think global warming is important, as individuals we can make small modifications to our lives that will reduce our carbon footprint and help in the long run. Some of these changes are harder than others, but if you think of it as an investment toward your children’s (and grandchildren’s) future, it is all worth it.

Here are 5 ways that you can reduce your family’s carbon footprint and help protect our environment:

  1. Vehicle based changes.

Unless you drive an electric vehicle that has been charged by clean energy, your vehicle is a primary source of carbon emissions. It is unrealistic, and also may not be the greenest option for everyone to trade in

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Courtesy of Nissan

their vehicle for an electric one. The manufacturing process of a new
vehicle alone produces a significant amount of waste and greenhouse gases. If you are in the position to purchase a new vehicle however, consider a fuel efficient, low greenhouse gas model (i.e. flex-fuel, hybrid or electric).

Don’t worry if you are not able to purchase a new vehicle at the moment (myself included). By properly maintaining your current vehicle, getting scheduled oil changes, tune-ups and checking tire pressure, you are not only creating a safer ride for you and your family, but you are ensuring that your vehicle is at its most fuel efficient.

Another car related modification you can make to reduce carbon emissions is to drive SLOWER and more thoughtfully. Rapid accelerations use significantly more gas, so does unnecessary idling. Try consolidating trips so you are driving less and always carpool when possible.

  1. Home based changes.

Heating, cooling, and lighting your home are the main sources of carbon emissions. If you have small children, keeping a moderate ambient home temperature is essential to their health and well being so rather than cutting the use of these things, consider making energy efficient improvements to your current systems. Newer and more efficient gas and electric water heaters and boilers are good investments because they will cut your energy bills and reduce carbon emissions. Insulation of walls, weather stripping doors and windows, and replacing or shielding drafty windows will also significantly reduce heating and cooling energy and make your home more enjoyable. Lastly, replacing halogen and fluorescent light bulbs with ultra efficient LED lights is a sound investment. LED lights cost more initially, but they last for many years and use a fraction of the energy that other light bulbs use.

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Image from blog.drummondhouseplans.com

Here is a helpful calculator to determine your savings from LED bulbs:

http://www.waclighting.com/calculator

If your budget permits, install a home solar energy system. Solar energy produces 91% less CO2 than natural gas powered energy and 96% less CO2 than coal. This requires a significant investment upfront, but companies are offering great financing deals and most energy companies charge less for solar energy and some even allow you to sell extra energy generated by your home back to the grid.

  1. Lifestyle changes.

Walk, bike, or use public transit more! Kids love getting out and getting some fresh air. Busses and trains are often a big hit with toddlers and young children as well. Not all American cities are easily commutable img_6962without a vehicle, but foregoing your car, even for small trips will make a huge difference. Plus, if enough people begin walking, biking or using public transit, cities begin adapting their focus to supporting these needs of their residents. Additionally, the extra exercise is good for your health!

Recycle, reduce, reuse, and consume less. One easy change here is to use reusable grocery bags. Many people already do this and some cities now charge you for grocery bags if you do not bring your own. This significantly reduces waste and also saves energy required to produce grocery bags.

For kids lunches, invest in reusable storage containers and lunch bags rather than packing food in disposable plastic or paper bags.

Be mindful about your consumption. This is a hard one with kids because they are constantly outgrowing clothes, getting new toys, and just require a lot of stuff in general. Consider buying used goods or using hand me downs from family and friends. When your children outgrow clothes and toys, find organizations or families to donate items to so they can be reused rather than end up in a landfill.

  1. Dietary changes.

Food production, packaging, and shipment are huge contributors to greenhouse gas production. Supporting local organic farming is one way to reduce your carbon footprint here. Hit the farmers markets, consider joining a CSA, and/or support smaller independent grocers who carry locally grow
n produce and other food products. Remember, organic options are not only healthier for you, but they are also greener options since a significant amount of energy is required to produce the pesticides, hormones, img_2141and antibiotics used in conventional farming.

If you are able to, start a garden! Kids love gardening and it can be so rewarding and educational for the whole family.

Lastly, eat less meat. Beef and lamb farming specifically are big producers of methane gas. Eating smaller portions and reducing your frequency of consumption will be better for your health and better for our environment.

  1. Take action!

Become active in your community by seeking out and supporting green businesses or those with plans in place for reducing greenhouse gases. For example, instead of going out to dinner at Outback Steakhouse or The Cheesecake Factory on your next date night, consider trying the new independent restaurant with the chef that is committed to using local and sustainable ingredients.

Start a conversation with your children about climate change and the importance of conserving our environment. I take the opportunity to discuss climate and natural habitats for animals with my daughter every time we visit our local zoo. For example, when it is hot out the polar bears are not very happy in their exhibit. On colder days, the polar bears are active and happy. Using this real life example, she now understands that polar bears thrive in colder climates and she understands the img_0057importance of reducing global warming.

Work with your local school, church, or other community organization to create a plan for reducing carbon footprint. Set goals and create a detailed plan to get there!

Lastly, make your voice heard. Call your senators and representatives and let them know that you are concerned about your environment. Urge them to pass measures that reduce carbon emissions.

Calculate your current carbon footprint here:

https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/

What are some ways that you are reducing your carbon footprint? Please share.

Here is a helpful link shared with me by a middle school environmental activist: https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/reduce-reuse-recycle-for-kids/

 

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Have you tested your water for lead?

Recent news of the Flint water crisis has brought to light many issues with our water works programs throughout the US. That combined with the fact that many American cities have outdated plumbing means that our drinking water may contain elements that can be harmful for human health.

Lead in water is currently the main concern because it is known to cause brain damage and other serious adverse health effects. Lead is especially dangerous for young children and the developing baby in pregnant mothers. Most notably, lead exposure in young children can cause learning and attention deficits, increased risk of ADHD, anemia, and in extreme cases, even death. For more info see the EPA’s guidelines for lead contamination of drinking water.

People who are most at risk for exposure to lead from water are those who live in homes built before 1986. Drinking from public fountains that were placed before 1986 or that are not properly maintained could also potentially be a source of lead and other water contaminants.

What many people do not realize is that even if a water source is pure and clean, lead and other heavy metals can leach out of pipes, plumbing fixtures, and solder if the water does not contain anti-corrosive chemicals. For more on this, the CDC has a helpful fact sheet.

The situation in Flint is extreme and very sad, but it has led to more awareness of the matter and now lead in water has been discovered in many other cities across the US, including our very own city of Portland. To read about the widespread nature of lead contamination of water, USA Today had a great article.

Portland is known to have a pristine water source, the Bull Run Watershed, and residents have fought hard to keep the water free of as many additives as possible, such as fluoride.

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Copyright: portlandoregon.gov

Well, it turns out that our ultra soft water is highly reactive with metal pipes and fixtures that are commonly found in older buildings, homes and even our schools. As a result, we are experiencing our own water crisis of sorts, that seems to be isolated to a subset of homes and public buildings, likely due to outdated plumbing .

We live in an older home that was built in the early 1900’s. When we moved in, I had the water tested for lead immediately. The home’s plumbing had been recently updated so that was reassuring, but it’s impossible to see every pipe and fitting as well as those feeding into your house. We utilized the free water test offered through Multnomah County and it came back negative. It was a big relief!

That was several years ago. Since then our city has experienced issues with e coli contamination of the water and as a result, they have increased the chlorine in the water. It was enough to cause a noticeable change in the taste and the smell so we have been using water filters for our drinking water. Interestingly, when not counteracted, the increased chlorine makes water even more corrosive to pipes putting you more at risk for lead contamination. It’s important to know that water filters can reduce chlorine and other heavy metals, but they can vary in their efficacy and lifespan so it’s important to check the specifications. The particular filters that we have been using do NOT filter out lead very well, unfor01_edit-180x180tunately.

The best thing that you can do for your family and for piece of mind is to have your water tested and to use filters as much as possible. I was fortunate to be able to try a home water testing kit by Test Assured.

IMG_9513.jpgIt was very easy to perform (in fact, I let my assistant Penny help me with one of the tests) and I was able to get an immediate answer. This particular testing kit also measured lead, the presence of bacteria, pesticide, iron, copper, nirtrates & nirtrites, chlorine Level, pH level, alkalinity and hardness. All of our measured valued matched what has been published by our water bureau from their own water analysis, which was reassuring. In addition, our water was still lead free! The pesticide test was a bit more ambiguous in the reading and it is unclear which pesticides it measures, but hopefully out water filters minimize any potential exposure there.

If you are interested in having your water tested for lead, I would first check with your water bureau to see if they offer a free lead test. If you live in the Portland Metro area, here is the link to request a free test. Another great resource for lead testing, advice, and support can be found at http://leadsafeamerica.org.

I will also be giving away a 10 in 1 at home testing kit which detects lead and other contaminants that was donated by TestAssured. Visit our Facebook page to enter to win!

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Super Sparkly Christmas Ornaments

My daughter is SO excited about Christmas this year! She is finally old enough to fully understand what is going on. The moment that Thanksgiving was over and I gave her the green light to start getting ready for Christmas, she was all about decorating and making crafts. It’s a great way to entertain her during the day as well and it has really helped to cut back on screen time.

Our first official Christmas craft was to make these ornaments for our tree.My mom was visiting for Thanksgiving and helped the kids with this project. It was fun!

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We made a salt based dough with cinnamon scent based on a recipe we found on another blog with some slight modifications:

http://www.sheknows.com/living/articles/1057575/stocking-stuffers-you-can-make-with-kids

*Rather than cutting holes in the shapes for twine to hang them, I chose to glue ribbon loops to the back of each one, this way they lay flat and do not twist and turn once hung on the tree.

*Because my kids were too impatient to let the paint dry, and then apply glue prior to glitter, we applied the glitter directly to the wet paint, hoping that it would be enough to make the glitter stick. In hind sight, I should have mixed some glue in or used a spray glue after we glittered to really set the glitter prior to hanging, because the glitter is already beginning to come off. Learn from my mistakes!

Here is a summary of our materials used and methods

Materials:

1 cup flour

1/2 cup salt

1/2 cup very warm water

10 drops cinnamon fragrance oil (more or less depending on personal preference) or cinnamon powder is oil is unavailable.

Glitter

Paint and brushes

Elmer’s Glue

Ribbon or twine

Glue gun (if available)

 

Method:

Combine the flour, salt and warm water. Mix until fully combined and dough forms.

Add the fragrance oil or cinnamon powder. Nead in.

Roll the dough to about 1/4 inch thick (use a lightly floured surface and roller).

Cut various shapes using cookie cutters. We found great cookie cutters for $1 each at Sur La Table!

Place the shapes on a cookie baking sheet and bake at 250 degrees F for 2.5 hours.

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Let your child or children have fun painting the shapes with non-toxic paint! Mix in a little glue to help the glitter stick or have an adult apply spray adhesive after the glitter is applied. Apply glitter and voila! Super sparkly shapes!

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The hardest part will be waiting for these to dry. My son loved checking on them and he kept asking if they were ready to go up.

Prior to hanging, glue the twine or ribbon loops onto the back of each ornament. A hot glue gun would be quickest but you can also just use lots of ol’ fashioned Elmer’s Glue.

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Once dry, hang on your tree and be proud of your work!

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Our growing family

img_3416I had been feeling like I should start looking for a real job again. You know, one where I might be able to actually use my degree. A job with benefits, a retirement fund, and other perks. But no. Life said no, not yet.

We were not trying to conceive, in fact, if anything we were actively trying not to conceive, though obviously not hard enough. Suddenly I found myself having to wrap my head around going through it all once more, the aches and pains of pregnancy, the labor and delivery of the baby, breastfeeding another child, and just dealing with chaos for at least another two years or so.

A third child at this point would not change too much. We are lucky to have the space in our home to house another child. We already own a minivan, ha! Sure there are added expenses associated with another child, but the tax benefits should help offset those costs. We can do this!

These are the thoughts that have been bombarding my brain for the past two months. I realize that it will be a huge change in our lives and a new trajectory for our family will have to be established.

My experience with my last two kids has given me the confidence to know that I can do this, but I’m not going to lie… it is still scary!

Rather than focus on all of the things that we no longer will be able to do, I’ve been focusing on my goals for this pregnancy and my plan for tackling life with 3 kids.

One thing that I would like to be better about this time around is exercise!

I was in great shape prior to getting pregnant with my first, but then never really got back into a regular exercise routine after that. In the months leading up to this pregnancy, I had started to workout more and I was hiking and walking and getting out for more physical activities. I could see the changes in my body and my wellbeing. It felt good. Plus, exercise has been proven to be good for fetal development!

This first trimester has been rough and has really wiped me off my feet, but I am slowly getting out of this energy rut and eager to resume a more active lifestyle.

After giving birth to two children, I am not so worried about the labor and delivery of this baby. It’s not going to be fun, but I’ll get through it. If anything, I’m more worried about how my youngest will take it. He is my baby now and he gets very jealous and possessive of me. My daughter on the other hand has baby fever so she will be a great help and will enjoy showering the baby with love.

Babywearing! There will be a lot of babywearing when the new baby arrives. Babywearing so I can still play with Shea and take him to classes and playdates while Penny is at school. Babywearing so I can do chores and take care of other household duties. I don’t think I could manage a third child without babywearing, so I am thankful to have that skill set.

One last thought… A big difference with this pregnancy compared to my others, is that I am not working! Having worked through my last two pregnancies, pretty much up until the day that I gave birth, this is a very different experience. If I am tired, I can rest. If I am hungry, I can make myself a snack. My stress level is nowhere near what it used to be (despite my kids driving me mad sometimes). It is really an ideal situation for me that hopefully translates to a healthier pregnancy.

Wish me luck and please share your stories!

I’d love to hear from parents with multiple children.

How do you do it?? What is your advice?

 

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